Tag Archives: Blogging

Weekly Blog Roundup: Sept 30 – Oct 6

7 Oct

Hey there! Here we go again with my weekly blog roundup:

Lytton_Strachey_Virginia_Woolf_at_Garsington_Manor_1923

Lytton Strachey and Virginia Woolf at Garsington Manor in 1923

On The Virginia Woolf Blog I posted Was Virginia Woolf Jealous of Lytton Strachey? In this post I discuss Virginia’s envy over the success of Lytton’s book, “Eminent Victorians,” in 1918.

Rose_ONeal_Greenhow_circa_1855_1865

Rose O’Neal Greenhow, circa 1855-1865

On The Civil War Saga I posted Rose O’Neal Greenhow. In this post I discuss the secret activities of the Confederate spy Rose O’Neal Greenhow, as well as her imprisonment and untimely death.

Squanto_Illustration_from_The_Teaching_of_Agriculture_in_High_School_Garland_Bricker_1911

Illustration of Squanto, circa 1911

On History of Massachusetts I posted When the Pilgrims Rescued Squanto. In this post I discuss when the pilgrims went on a rescue mission to save Squanto after he was kidnapped by his enemy, Corbitant, at the village of Nemasket.

I recently added the WordPress Popular Posts plugin to my blogs, which lists the top 10 posts of the week. As a result, I thought I would add a new section to my weekly blog roundup: Top 10 Posts of the Week:

Civil War Saga
1. Child Soldiers in the Civil War
2. Dinosaurs in Gettysburg
3. Roles of Women in the Civil War
4. Battle of Gettysburg
5. Mark Twain’s Civil War Experience
6. Female Soldiers at the Battle of Gettysburg
7. Robert Ford – The Man Who Shot Jesse James
8. The Diary of John Wilkes Booth
9. Abraham Lincoln Was Related to Paul Revere
10. Women Spies in the Civil War

History of Massachusetts
1. The Salem Witch Trials
2. John Proctor: First Male Accused Witch
3. Timeline of the Salem Witch Trials
4. Sarah Good: Accused Witch
5. The Boston Massacre
6. Where Did the Shot Heard Round the World Happen?
7. Animals in the Salem Witch Trials
8. Deborah Sampson: Woman Warrior of the American Revolution
9. The Stamp Act
10. The History of Danvers State Hospital

Virginia Woolf Blog
1. Virginia Woolf’s Strange Treatment to Cure Her Mental Illness
2. Virginia Woolf’s Suicide Note to Vanessa Bell
3. Vanessa Bell’s Reaction to Virginia Woolf and Vita-Sackville-West’s Affair
4. Virginia Woolf’s Suicide
5. Virginia Woolf’s Misquoted Suicide Note
6. Virginia Woolf’s Affair with Vita Sackville-West
7. Virginia Woolf’s Last Diary Entry
8. Virginia Woolf’s First Car
9. Timeline of Virginia Woolf’s Life
10. The Marriage of Virginia and Leonard Woolf

Weekly Blog Roundup: Sept 23 – Sept 29

30 Sep

Hey there! Here we go again with my weekly blog roundup:

Vanessa_Stella_Virginia_Stephen_1896

Virginia Woolf with her sisters, Vanessa and Stella, in 1896

On The Virginia Woolf Blog I posted Virginia Woolf at Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. In this post I discuss Virginia’s description of the queen’s procession throughout London and how she later reconstructed the moment for her character Clarissa Dalloway.

Belle_Boyd_1855_1865

Confederate spy, Belle Boyd, circa 1855-1865

On The Civil War Saga I posted Women Spies in the Civil War. In this post I discuss that various ways women spies gathered and smuggled messages and supplies during the Civil War. In the Civil War Saga library corner, I also added a copy of Confederate spy Rose O’Neal Greenhow’s prison diary: My Imprisonment and the First Year of Abolition Rule at Washington.

Squanto_Illustration_from_The_Teaching_of_Agriculture_in_High_School_Garland_Bricker_1911

Illustration of Squanto, circa 1911

On History of Massachusetts I posted Squanto: The Former Slave. In this post I discuss Squanto’s early life and how he was captured by an English captain and brought to Europe as a slave.

Next week, I’ll publish a post about Confederate spy Rose O’Neal Greenhow, Virginia Woolf’s jealousy over Lytton Strachey’s success and another post about Squanto and the time the pilgrims went on a rescue mission to save him after he was kidnapped by his enemy, Corbitant.

Weekly Blog Roundup: Sept 16 – Sept 22

23 Sep

Hello! Here’s my weekly blog roundup:

virginia_Woolf_1916_cornwall

Virginia Woolf in Cornwall in 1916

On The Virginia Woolf Blog I posted Virginia Woolf & the Neighborhood Children. In this post I discuss how the neighborhood children in Rodmell often saw Virginia walking around the village and were both fascinated yet scared of her.

The_Massacre_at_Fort_Pillow_Harpers_Weekly_Apr_30_1864

Illustration of the Massacre at Fort Pillow published in Harper’s Weekly on April 30, 1864

On The Civil War Saga I posted The Fort Pillow Massacre. In this post I discuss the possible events that took place after the battle at Fort Pillow in 1864, when over 200 Union soldiers, mostly African-American, were found dead.

Danvers_State_Hospital_Kirkbride_Complex_circa_1893

Danvers State Hospital, circa 1893

On History of Massachusetts I posted The Danvers State Hospital. In this post I discuss the dark history of the Danvers State Hospital, originally known as the State Lunatic Asylum in Danvers, located on Hathorne Hill where the Salem Witch Trials Judge, John Hathorne, once lived.

Next week, I’ll publish a post about Squanto’s time as a slave in Europe, women spies in the Civil War and Virginia Woolf at Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee.

Another Lincoln Movie On The Way!

21 Sep

Saving Lincoln MovieI discovered in a comment on the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library blog, that there is yet another Lincoln movie coming out soon besides Spielberg’s “Lincoln.” The second film is an indie movie titled “Saving Lincoln” and it details the friendship between Lincoln and his bodyguard Ward Hill Lamon. Here’s the official movie website: www.savinglincoln.com. What I can’t figure out is the release date. The movie’s facebook page and all the news articles about the film state the movie is coming out in Fall 2012, but it is Fall 2012 and there’s still no release date. Well, whenever it comes out I’ll definitely be seeing it!

Dogtown Descendant

20 Sep

Typical_Dogtown_House_Illustration_From_In_The_Heart_of_Cape_Ann_by_Charles_Mann_1896

Illustration From “In the Heart of Cape Ann” by Charles Mann, circa 1896

I recently came across this post: John Morgan Stanwood of Dogtown: finding ancestors in a novel on a blog run by Nathaniel Taylor, a descendant of former Dogtown resident John Morgan Stanwood. For those unfamiliar with Dogtown, it is an abandoned settlement in Gloucester that was once home to about 80 families before it was abandoned in the early 1800s and taken over by suspected witches, feral dogs and vagabonds.

In this post, Nathaniel discusses the many ways his ancestor, and Dogtown residents in general, have been depicted in the numerous books about Dogtown. Nathaniel highlights how writers and historians have created their own romanticized versions of the town and its residents, mostly due to a lack of accurate information about them.

To add some truth to the matter, Nathaniel includes an actual photo of a Dogtown resident, his ancestor Ruth Morgan Stanwood.

I find it fascinating not only to hear from an actual Dogtown descendant but also to hear some truth about this mysterious town and its residents. So much of the town’s history has been lost or is just unknown that it’s sometimes hard to separate fact from fiction.

Weekly Blog Roundup: Sept 2 – Sept 8

9 Sep

Hi everyone! Here we go again with my weekly blog roundup:

RMS_Titanic_Southampton_April_10_1912

The RMS Titanic in Southampton on April 10 in 1912

On The Virginia Woolf Blog I posted Virginia Woolf’s Fascination with the Titanic. In this post I discuss Virginia’s interest in the Titanic disaster and how she even toyed with the idea of writing about it.

African_American_soldiers_at_abandoned_farmhouse_in_Dutch_Gap_Virginia_1864.

Two African-American soldiers at an abandoned farmhouse in Dutch Gap, Virginia in 1864

On The Civil War Saga I posted African-American POWs and the Lieber Code. In this post I discuss the Confederate army selling captured black soldiers into slavery and the groundbreaking human rights law that Lincoln signed to stop it.

On History of Massachusetts I posted The Disturbance of the Indian Shore Cemetery. In this post I discuss when the gravestones of an Indian burial ground in Lakeville were moved to make way for development projects.

Lakeville_Assawompsett_Pond_Map_1893

Map of Lakeville, Ma, circa 1893

I really enjoy writing about people who have often been ignored and overlooked in the history books so I plan on writing a lot more about Native-Americans, African-Americans and women in future posts. This includes a series of posts about Squanto from Plymouth, the role of Native-Americans in the Civil War and some more posts about female Civil War soldiers. If you have any blog post ideas, let me know!

My Weekly Blog Roundup: Aug 26 – Sept 1

2 Sep

Hello again! Here’s my weekly blog roundup:

1927 Singer Junior

On The Virginia Woolf Blog I posted Virginia Woolf’s First Car. In this post I discuss how the success of  “To The Lighthouse” allowed Virginia to purchase her first car and brought a new found freedom to her life.

Nimrod Burke of the 23rd United States Colored Infantry Regiment

On The Civil War Saga I posted African-American Soldiers Protested Their Low Pay. In this post I discuss why black soldiers were only paid $7 a month, while white soldiers were paid $13, and what these soldiers did about it.

115 Commonwealth ave

On History of Massachusetts I posted John Wilkes Booth Owned Property in Boston. In this post I discuss when John Wilkes Booth purchased 115 Commonwealth Ave in 1863 with intentions to build a house there.

If you haven’t checked it out yet, stop by the Civil War Saga’s new Library Corner, where you’ll find free digitized copies of many historical books about the Civil War.

Best of History Websites

27 Aug

I recently stumbled upon an amazing website that is a must-see for any history buff: www.besthistorysites.net. This site is a directory of over 1200 of the best history websites on the internet. Although designed as a resource guide for teachers, any history fan can enjoy it. One of my favorites is the British Library’s Turning The Pages website, which contains scanned copies of Mozart’s music diary, William Blake’s notebook and Leonardo DaVinci’s sketch book.

Best of the History Websites covers topics ranging from prehistory and biblical times up through modern times, such as the Egyptian uprising and the Iraq war, and also covers subjects like art history, maps and oral history. While the site does have a few dead links here and there, the list of links is impressive and it will probably take you months to explore every link. So go check it out, and you’re welcome!

My Weekly Blog Roundup: Aug 19 – Aug 25

26 Aug

Hello! It’s that time again. Here’s my weekly blog roundup:

Rupert Brooke in 1915

On The Virginia Woolf Blog I posted When Virginia Woolf Went Skinny Dipping With Rupert Brooke. In this post I discuss the time Virginia visited her friend, a poet named Rupert Brooke, in Cambridge and went for a midnight swim with him in the nude.

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

On The Civil War Saga I posted Dinosaurs in Gettysburg. In this post I discuss the historic Gettysburg battlefield and a series of dinosaur footprints discovered there in 1937.

Abe Lincoln in 1847

On History of Massachusetts I posted Abraham Lincoln’s Massachusetts Ancestors. In this post I detail Lincoln’s family history, including his first ancestor to settle in the New World, Samuel Lincoln of Hingham, Mass.

If you haven’t gotten a chance yet, check out the History of Massachusetts’ new Library Corner, where you’ll find digitized copies of many historical books about the history of Massachusetts.  Next week the Civil War Saga will get a Library Corner as well, so keep a look out.

Official Lincoln Movie Poster Released

24 Aug

The official movie poster for Steven Spielberg’s new film “Lincoln” has been released. Instead of covering the span of Lincoln’s life, the film will focus on the last four months of Lincoln’s life as he tried to bring an end to the Civil War. Daniel Day-Lewis stars as the late president and bears a striking resemblance to him. The film is set for a limited release on November 9 and a full release on November 16. I’m really looking forward to seeing this!

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